Donald Trump Not the First Conspiracy Theory President

While President Trump has been criticized over the years for asking politically incorrect questions about unanswered mysteries, other inquisitive men have occupied the White House as well. JFK, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, for instance, were reportedly very interested in certain unanswered questions.

By Donald Jeffries

President Donald Trump has excited independent-thinking Americans with his seeming fondness for what the mainstream media reflexively calls “conspiracy theories.” Trump used terms familiar to conspiracy researchers everywhere during his 2016 presidential campaign. His repeated jabs at “globalists” and “globalism” were especially noticeable. His “America first” slogan hadn’t been heard on a political stage since a movement by that name lobbied against the U.S. entering World War II. Because of this, the establishment cringed at the term, and compared Trump and his followers to Nazis.

Even before his presidential campaign, Trump questioned the murky facts about Barack Obama’s past, for which he was smeared as a “birther.” He boldly declared, in a national television interview, that “[Obama] may not have been born in this country.” In another speech, he stated, “The people that went to school with him, they don’t even know who he is.” After Loretta Fuddy, who had verified what many considered to be a fraudulent birth certificate for Obama, died in a December 2013 plane crash, citizen Trump tweeted out, “How amazing, the state health director who verified copies of Obama’s ‘birth certificate’ died in plane crash today. All others lived.”

Trump has long spoken about the obvious links between vaccines and autism, even mentioning the subject in the Republican presidential campaign debates. He also jokingly associated Ted Cruz’s father with Lee Harvey Oswald. He noted that many people doubt the official version of Vince Foster’s death, although, in typical Trump fashion, he would go on to name the man who led the cover-up in the Foster case as his nominee to the Supreme Court. He questioned the phony nature of the official unemployment figures, although, again, he brags about those same figures now. In 2012, citizen Trump called global warming a “hoax.” Trump went on Michael Savage’s radio show and openly questioned the official story of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s strange death. He was clearly aware of the dubious details, noting that Scalia’s face “is a pretty unusual place to find a pillow.”

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Regarding the events of Sept. 11, 2001, Trump has said the government “did know it was coming . . . they did have advance notice.” Trump early on remarked about how there must have been powerful explosives in the World Trade Center buildings.

He even alluded to the 2001 death of then Congressman Joe Scarborough’s young, attractive aide Lori Klausutis, whose body was found in his Florida office. After a typically petty November 2017 feud with the Morning Joe host, Trump tweeted out, “And will they terminate low ratings Joe Scarborough based on the ‘unsolved mystery’ that took place in Florida years ago? Investigate!”

While no other president has ever been as conspiratorial-minded as Trump—at least in public, anyway—there have been other “conspiracy theorists” in the White House. John F. Kennedy, before becoming the victim of the highest-profile conspiracy of the 20th century, gave a wonderful speech in 1961 in which he declared, “We are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy.” He was speaking of the communists, but his words can be interpreted, and have been interpreted in a much broader sense. Kennedy, of course, famously vowed to “splinter the CIA into a thousand pieces and scatter it to the winds.” In 2017, WikiLeaks would use this well-known quote as the password to decrypt its latest release of CIA documents.

Noted JFK assassination researcher David Lifton, author of the book Best Evidence, claimed that Ronald Reagan was keenly interested in the JFK assassination, and, in fact, regularly kept a stack of books on the subject on his nightstand.

During his presidential campaign, Reagan blasted Jimmy Carter and the fact that “19 key members of the administration are or have been members of the Trilateral Commission.” Reagan would predictably install Trilateralists like CIA Director William Casey and Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger in his cabinet, not to mention selecting Trilateralist and Council of Foreign Relations stalwart George H.W. Bush as vice president.

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According to Bill Clinton’s Associate Attorney General Webb Hubbell, upon entering the White House, he was instructed by Clinton: “I want you to find the answers to two questions for me. One, who killed JFK? And two, are there UFOs?” Clinton would famously declare at a press conference, in the midst of all the furor created by Oliver Stone’s 1991 film JFK, that he was satisfied that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone. Clinton doesn’t seem to have done anything to ferret out the truth about UFOs, either.

Although he almost certainly knows better, Trump would publicly state that he believed Oswald shot Kennedy. And despite bragging repeatedly about doing so, he would delay the release of still-classified JFK assassination documents until 2021.

Kennedy, of course, was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963. Reagan was the victim of an unsuccessful assassination attempt shortly after entering office. Trump has received more threats than all other presidents combined. Will history repeat itself?

Donald Jeffries is a highly respected author and researcher whose work on the JFK, RFK, and MLK assassinations and other high crimes of the Deep State has been read by millions of people across the world. Jeffries is also the author of two books currently being sold by the AFP Online Store.




Suppression of Piper’s JFK Book Exemplifies ‘Media Dishonesty’

Not only has the media buried Michael Collins Piper’s book, Final Judgement; even JFK researchers are too scared to touch his explosive book.

By Dr. Kevin Barrett

I began studying the JFK assassination in 1975. As a 16-year-old student at Pewaukee High School in Wisconsin, where then-librarian Charlotte Smith directed my attention toward such interesting and controversial authors as Immanuel Velikovsky, Erich Von Daniken, and Kurt Vonnegut, I was open to ideas outside the usual orbit. So when a friend invited me to Mark Lane’s talk on the JFK assassination years ago, my response was, “Mark who?” and then, “Sure, why not?”

Lane changed my life by presenting a convincing case that the Warren Commission was wrong: The president had been killed in a high-level coup d’état. The preposterous story of the “magic bullet” causing seven entry-exit wounds in two men, and the fact that Life magazine had reversed the frames of the Zapruder film to produce the illusion of a forward head snap supporting the official story that JFK had been shot from behind, amounted to a convincing prima facie case of establishment complicity.

During the days, weeks, and years after Lane’s talk I read extensively on the case. The upshot was that Lane’s “American coup” hypothesis was confirmed beyond a reasonable doubt. But the question of the identity and motives of the coup plotters was not so easily resolved.

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In 1979 I published an article in the University of Wisconsin-Madison student newspaper summarizing evidence of CIA involvement in the assassination. Before the article was published (but after I had submitted it to numerous outlets) a self-described “CIA assassination team member” showed up uninvited for dinner at the student housing co-op where I lived. This odd young woman claimed she had a CIA chip implanted in her brain, and that her job was to conduct reconnaissance against potential CIA assassination targets. When I recounted the bizarre coincidence to my favorite journalism professor, John McNelly, his response was blunt: “Kevin, they are messing with you.”

Truth Jihad, Kevin BarrettIt wasn’t until the mid-2000s, when I got interested in 9/11 and noticed the obvious role of Zionists in that event, that I sat down to read Michael Collins Piper’s Final Judgment. I had been marginally aware of the existence of Piper’s book for years, but for various reasons—including being busy earning a Ph.D. in an unrelated field, and noticing that the JFK research community didn’t seem to think that much of Piper—I had steered clear of it.

I quickly discovered that Piper had marshalled a strong case for Israel playing a key role, perhaps even the lead role, in the JFK assassination. Yet many leading JFK experts were strangely resistant to admitting this.

In 2007 I interviewed University of California professor Peter Dale Scott, a leading figure in both JFK and 9/11 studies and the main popularizer of the term “deep state.” The interview was broadcast live on RBN radio. Piper called in to the show and asked Scott what he thought about Israel’s role in the JFK assassination. Scott hemmed and hawed, saying (in essence) that he wasn’t convinced by the evidence assembled in Final Judgment. Since that evidence struck me as very strong, I wondered whether Scott’s discomfiture with Piper was driven by conscious or unconscious fear of “going there” and risking the kinds of attacks that would surely plague him if he endorsed Piper’s thesis.

Since Piper’s untimely death in 2015, the stature of his work in general, and Final Judgment in particular, has continued to rise. Some of the best minds of our time now recognize that Piper’s JFK work is indispensable.

Dr. Laurent Guyénot, the French historian and author of From Yahweh to Zion, is one of the key figures driving the resurgence of interest in Final Judgment. Guyénot shows that the methods apparently used by Zionist plotters of the JFK and RFK assassinations are a standard modus operandi that the same forces have used in dozens of other operations. From Yahweh to Zion puts the Kennedy assassinations in historical perspective, not only in terms of 20th and 21st century Zionist covert operations, but also in light of a larger history stretching back 2,500 years.

Another intellectual heavyweight promoting Piper’s work is Ron Unz, publisher of the indispensable alternative media digest Unz Review. Unz, who has done graduate work in theoretical physics at Cambridge and Stanford universities, recently published “American Pravda: The JFK Assassination: Part 1: What Happened? and Part 2: Who Did It?” In that two-part series, and in a radio interview with me, Unz argues that the “most extreme” example of media dishonesty surrounding the JFK assassination is the suppression of Piper’s Final Judgment—not just by the mainstream and alternative media, but also by most of the JFK research community.

Mike Piper’s two-volume set is available from the AFP Online store. 

After spending 43 years (intermittently) researching the JKF assassination, I wholeheartedly agree.

*Michael Collins Piper’s massive 740-page Final Judgment: The Missing Link in the JFK Assassination Conspiracy is available in a handy two-book set for only $40 plus $6 S&H in the U.S. exclusively from AFP’s Online Store. Click here to learn more about Final Judgment and order from AFP.

Kevin Barrett, Ph.D., is an Arabist-Islamologist scholar and one of America’s best-known critics of the War on Terror. From 1991 through 2006, Dr. Barrett taught at colleges and universities in San Francisco, Paris, and Wisconsin. In 2006, however, he was attacked by Republican state legislators who called for him to be fired from his job at the University of Wisconsin-Madison due to his political opinions.




How the CIA’s MK-Ultra Ruined Their Lives

A group of Canadians is fighting back against years of abuse under a secret experimental U.S. program, and it’s not the first time. A Canadian judge compensated 77 former victims of MK-Ultra in 1992. The U.S., whose CIA oversaw the mind-control program, has yet to see a similar suit successfully brought to trial.

By S.T. Patrick

Over 40 Canadians are striking back at one of the most notorious covert operations of the 20th century. Calling themselves Survivors Allied Against Government Abuse (SAAGA), the survivors recently gathered in Montreal to publicly share stories of the MK-Ultra abuse that destroyed their lives and their families. Their next step is to bring a class-action lawsuit against Canada’s national government in Ottawa.

The MK-Ultra class-action suit centers on the Allan Memorial Institute (AMI) in Montreal, a psychiatric hospital that also houses the Psychiatry Department of McGill University’s Royal Victoria Hospital.

As an extension of the CIA-funded MK-Ultra project, AMI doctors used sleeping medications, electroshock therapy, and hallucinogens such as LSD to experiment on unwitting patients. Some of the more troubling allegations consist of patients having been involuntarily sedated into a medically induced coma for weeks as loops of repeated statements or noise played.

Project MK-Ultra was a CIA mind-control program that was operated in conjunction with the Office of Scientific Intelligence and the U.S. Army Biological Warfare Laboratories. The program officially operated from 1953 to 1973, but covert experimentation on the limits of the human mind existed before MK-Ultra and will exist into the future. Though CIA Director Richard Helms ordered all documents on MK-Ultra destroyed in 1973, a Freedom of Information Act request in 1977 uncovered over 20,000 documents that had been destined for eradication. More information was declassified to the public in 2001.

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Implementation of the MK-Ultra program at the Allan Memorial Institute was undertaken by its founding director, Dr. Donald Ewen Cameron. Cameron served as the president of both the American Psychiatric Association from 1952-53 and the Canadian Psychiatric Association from 1958-59 before becoming the first head of the World Psychiatric Association in 1961.

In 1945, Cameron was part of a team that traveled to Germany during the Nuremberg Trials to evaluate Rudolf Hess, deputy führer to Adolf Hitler from 1933 to 1941. Their diagnosis of Hess was hysteria and amnesia, but Cameron’s later analysis of German society was even more troubling, albeit completely fallacious. In his paper “The Social Reorganization of Germany,” Cameron argued for a complete reorganization of German society to prevent what he believed would be another threat to world peace in 30 years.

After the Manhattan Project regarding atomic weapons was revealed in the United States, he argued for the necessity of behavioral scientists to act as social planners in civilized societies. The United Nations, he argued, would then become the conduit by which psychiatric goals could be intertwined with globalism. Society, Cameron believed, should be divided between the “weak” and the “strong.” Those who could not handle the state of the world—as the globalists constructed it—would then be “weak,” while those who accepted its stark realities without rebellion would be “strong.”

Authors such as Naomi Klein have questioned the real reason for the AMI’s MK-Ultra experimentation. She believes that Cameron’s initial work at AMI was not about brainwashing. Instead, it was an effort to develop the art of torture and lay the groundwork for the CIA’s two-step psychological torture method. The focus on drug inducement and electroshock therapy was designed, according to Klein, to extract information from “resistant sources.”

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As part of the MK-Ultra project, the United States psychiatric community also experimented widely with the suggestive power of hypnosis, with and without drugs. Richard Condon’s novel The Manchurian Candidate was released at the height of the MK-Ultra operations. It featured a presidential assassination attempt undertaken by a hypnotized, brainwashed subject. Since 1968, speculation has existed as to the role of hypnosis in the life of Sirhan Sirhan, imprisoned for the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy.

To date, a similar class-action suit has not been filed in America. It could be that a similar group exists, carefully monitoring the Canadian case before filing.

Nancy Layton was admitted to Cameron’s care at the age of 18. She suffered from depression. Within six months of being treated by Cameron, Layton developed an acute schizophrenia that had not existed before she had been under Cameron’s care.

“I could not believe this was allowed,” Marlene Levenson, whose aunt was victimized by AMI’s mind-control program, told CTV Montreal. “These were innocent people who went in for mild depression—even if it was severe depression, postpartum, neurological things that happened—they came out completely ravaged and their life was ruined.”

This is not the first such legal case in Canada. In 1992, Justice Minister Kim Campbell compensated 77 former victims of MK-Ultra. Others were denied when they were deemed “not damaged enough.” The empirical level at which someone has to be damaged “enough” by his or her own government has yet to be set. The bar, however, should be low when a government harms the very people it is democratically meant to protect and serve.

S.T. Patrick holds degrees in both journalism and social studies education. He spent ten years as an educator and now hosts the “Midnight Writer News Show.” His email is STPatrickAFP@gmail.com.




‘Jonestown’ 40 Years Later: Was Peoples Temple an Intel Op Gone Bad?

With the 40th anniversary of “The Jonestown Massacre” approaching, on November 18th, AFP offers a three-part series on the Rev. Jim Jones, the Peoples Temple, and the massacre/mass suicide that took over 900 lives in the jungles of Guyana.  

By S.T. Patrick

I: Jim Jones, the CIA & the FBI

Researcher Jim Hougan says the origins of famed cult leader Jim Jones are shrouded in intelligence activities. This is part one of three, originally published in American Free Press Issue 15 & 16, April 9 & 16, 2018.

Tragedy is often complex. In the mainstream media’s haste to explain the Nov. 18, 1978 massacre at Jonestown, Guyana, a quick resolution emerged. It was the oft-repeated, cautionary tale of a madman pushed beyond the brink of sanity. Moreover, it was a theme popularized in the “decade of decadence,” the 1970s.

Communal living had reached a peak of countercultural dissatisfaction, so much so that the media had turned its raging eye on these communities, which it now disparagingly called “cults.” Jonestown was portrayed as the failure of this anti-establishment movement. Its climax took the lives of over 900 men, women, and children, and was furthermore a glaring example of the imminent debacle incurred when following a fanatic “off the grid.”

Independent researchers and authors have disagreed with the mainstream mass media and have done so since the massacre occurred. What if Jonestown was not simply the inevitable result of a sociological experiment? What if anti-establishment movements are not doomed to fail on their own? And what if the rise of the Rev. Jim Jones was much more complicated than we had been told by Walter Cronkite, John Chancellor, and Frank Reynolds in 1978?

Jim Hougan’s breakthrough as an author and researcher came with his alternative take on Richard Nixon’s downfall, Secret Agenda: Watergate, Deep Throat, and the CIA. He established himself as an authority on the 1970s with Decadence: Radical Nostalgia, Narcissism, and Decline in the Seventies, and examined the sordid relationship between the CIA and private industry in Spooks: The Private Use of Secret Agents.

His multi-part article “Jim Jones, Dan Mitrione, and the Peoples Temple”—available at “JimHougan.com”—is the culmination of decades of Jonestown research. Hougan combines Jones’s biography, FBI and CIA infiltration, and governmental shenanigans to uncover what really occurred in northwest Guyana, and how the parishioners of the Peoples Temple found themselves over 5,000 miles from the Bay Area of California.

James Warren Jones was born in Depression-era Indiana. A friend of his mother took Jones to church, where he found his religious zeal. He was soon taken under the wing of a female evangelist who led faith-healing revivals at the Gospel Tabernacle Church, a Pentecostal offshoot of the Holy Rollers. While no hard evidence of an inappropriate sexual relationship exists, Hougan reports that the beginning of Jones’s reptilian nightmares coincided with his association with the woman. His later tendency to sexually humiliate those who had angered him was lamented by those who remained loyal and may also have been a sign of sexual abuse experienced as a youth.

As a 15-year-old giving sidewalk sermons in economically depressed Richmond, Indiana, Jones met Dan Mitrione, the anti-communist police chief, whose path would repeatedly and not-so-coincidentally mimic that of Jones.

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Hougan infers that Mitrione may have recruited Jones as an informant within the black community. The Peoples Temple would include a predominantly black congregation, and Jones’s influence in the community was rising. Starting in 1956, the FBI’s Counter Intelligence Program (COINTELPRO) had observed, infiltrated, discredited, and disrupted subversive political and racial groups throughout the country. Mitrione’s ties to the FBI, the CIA, and Jones would continue throughout the remainder of his life. It was at this time that family members also report Jones engaging in private meetings with men they believed were government agents.

Indiana was quite a surprising hotbed of intelligence activity. The CIA’s Richard Helms and William Harvey were born in Indianapolis, and the University of Indiana, which Jones attended, was also the alma mater of the Symbionese Liberation Army’s Angela Atwood, William Harris, and Emily Harris. Hougan also ties the ownership of the Indianapolis-based Saturday Evening Post to CIA activity.

Jones purchased a former synagogue from Rabbi Maurice Davis in 1956. From the church’s history, Jones created the Peoples Temple name. Researchers are unsure how Jones may have raised the $50,000 used for the purchase, and Davis’s intentions in giving Jones a “little or no money down” deal are unknown. What is known is that Rabbi Davis was an anti-cult activist and “deprogrammer” associated with Dr. Hordat Sukhdeo, whom the State Department would later pay to travel to Guyana and bury Jones publicly as a cult leader.

Father Divine was the well-known “black messiah” of Philadelphia. His tens of thousands of Peace Mission followers earned him a seven-figure income, monitoring by the FBI, and Jones’s admiration. Jones visited Divine often and once, after Divine’s death, claimed he was the white reincarnation of Divine. Hougan speculates that Jones’s ultimate goal could have been integrating Divine’s followers into the Peoples Temple, but he also suggests that Jones could have been gathering “racial intelligence” under Mitrione’s guidance.

A biography of Divine was found in Jones’s effects in the aftermath of Jonestown. Within the biography, author Sara Harris alluded to mass suicide.

“If Father Divine were to die,” Harris wrote, “mass suicides among Negroes in his movement

could certainly result.”

This would not be the final time that the subject of mass suicide would interest Jones.

As the Peoples Temple continued to expand to over 2,000 parishioners, the reverend would make a curious decision to travel to Cuba and South America. He would not be alone. His experiences, his contacts, and his research would change the direction of the Peoples Temple and would lead them first to California and then to Guyana, where their end would be near.

II: Was Jim Jones an American Spy?

Biographers say the cult leader’s travels to Cuba and Brazil in the 1960s weren’t evangelism at all. They were actually intelligence missions. This is part two of three, originally published in American Free Press Issue 19 & 20, May 7 & 14, 2018.

By the end of the 1950s, the Reverend Jim Jones had grown his Peoples Temple to over 2,000 members. Considering this was the Cold War-era Midwest in a period long before the rise of mega-churches, Jones’s openly socialistic congregation was a surprising yet phenomenal success.

Jones was riding a meteoric rise as a pastor. Therefore, his actions in February 1960 become all the more curious and suspicious.

Fidel Castro, Raul Castro, Che Guevara, and their 26th of July Movement had overthrown the CIA-Mafia puppet Fulgencio Batista in Cuba. In their first year, they were already countering incursions and bombings from U.S.-supported exiles working out of Miami. Vice President Richard Nixon was lobbying for and overseeing the formulation of a plan that would end with the Kennedy-era Bay of Pigs invasion in April 1961. From 1959-1963, Cuba was arguably the hottest epicenter of the Cold War.

In the midst of this political whirlwind, Jones inexplicably decided to travel to Havana. According to witness Carlos Foster, who met with Jones in Cuba, Jones was attempting to locate families willing to relocate to Indianapolis as part of a Peoples Temple recruitment project. Foster also claims Jones was scouting Latin American locations for potential extension centers.

Jones biographers, such as Tim Reiterman, disagree that the main purpose of the Cuban excursion was evangelism.

Reiterman reported that Jones later showed off photos from his Cuban trip. One such picture

featured a mangled pilot lying lifeless in the wreckage of a plane crash. Jones had also

claimed that he had met some Cuban leaders, and he showed a picture of himself with a fatigue-clad man that looked similar to Fidel Castro.

Jim Hougan, the author of the three-part “Jim Jones, Dan Mitrione, and the Peoples Temple,” which can be read on “JimHougan.com,” was more pointed when assessing Jones’s photographic travelogue.

“Pictures of that sort could only have been of interest to Castro’s enemies and the CIA,” Hougan wrote.

Under the guise of scouting safe places in case of a nuclear apocalypse, Jones then traveled to Brazil in 1962. En route, Jones stopped in Guyana, which was still a British colony. Jones learned of another mass suicide story that had long been a part of Guyanese history.

While in Belo Horizonte and Rio de Janeiro, Jones socialized with American expatriates and Brazilians who were rabid anti-communists. Hougan compares Jones’s time in Brazil to Lee Harvey Oswald’s time in New Orleans in 1963.

Jones was not alone in Brazil. Dan Mitrione was serving at a post within the U.S. consulate. Many, including Hougan, believe Mitrione was an intelligence handler for Jones dating back to their time in Richmond, Ind.

According to Jones, the emotional effects of the John F. Kennedy assassination led him back to Indiana in late 1963. What he returned to was a congregation whose attendance had dissipated to less than a hundred parishioners. Mainstream chroniclers of Jonestown have posited that Jones was sightseeing and gallivanting through Latin America, taking in the culture as an uber-tourist. Meanwhile, the church he had worked so hard to build—and the church so tied to what he professed as his true ideology—was all but dismantling without him. This has led revisionists to further contend that there was some covert mission that guided the travels of both Jones and Mitrione.

New World Order Assassins, ThornAgain using nuclear war as a reason for mobility, Jones returned to Indiana briefly, only to move the Peoples Temple to northern California, outside of Ukiah. Unlike the anti-communism he had professed in Brazil, he again turned to “apostolic socialism” in his sermons. Jones’s dogma becomes quite confusing at this point, as he begins publicly preaching against Christianity, the King James Version of the Bible, and God.

Within five years, Jones’s popularity had grown, and he had opened Peoples Temple branches in the center of the FBI’s COINTELPRO heartland—San Francisco, San Fernando, and Los Angeles. Templars also became more active in California politics. Their support was vital to San Francisco Mayor George Moscone’s win in 1975. In turn, Moscone appointed Jones as the head of San Francisco’s Housing Authority Commission.

The Peoples Temple had found a large following in the Golden State. They had also found allies in assemblyman Willie Brown, Gov. Jerry Brown, Lt. Gov. Mervyn Dymally, Harvey Milk, Walter Mondale, and Rosalynn Carter.

While California brought Jones and the Peoples Temple more notoriety, it also attracted more scrutiny. When an exposé in New West magazine criticized Jones and the Temple, the reverend could see that his house of cards was about to crumble. Journalist Marshall Kilduff would allege physical, emotional, and sexual abuse inside the Peoples Temple. It was time to flee California and the United States, altogether.

In the summer of 1977, Jones and his most influential members decided the time had come for what would be a final pilgrimage to the place where they believed they would be most free—Guyana.

III: No Mass Suicide at Jonestown?

Very few of the official “Kool-Aid” theories have proven to be conclusive, and research indicates that most Peoples Temple followers tragically died by injection—not ingestion. This is the conclusion of our three-part series, originally published in American Free Press Issue 23 & 24, June 4 & 11, 2018.

Rep. Leo Ryan (D-Calif.) had just been elected to a fourth term when he traveled to the Jonestown settlement of Rev. Jim Jones in northwest Guyana. Acting on the pleas of family members whose loved ones had joined the Peoples Temple, Ryan was investigating the charge that his constituents were being held in the South American country against their will.

Ryan was a crusading congressman. As an assemblyman, he had taken a substitute teacher position in south central Los Angeles so that he could document the conditions after the Watts riots of 1965. He later used a pseudonym to enter Folsom Prison as an inmate, just to investigate firsthand the conditions behind the bars of California prisons. Whether societal or penal, Ryan was a keen observer of what it was to be or feel trapped. On Nov. 1, 1978, he announced that he was going to Jonestown. In what would later prove an interesting turn of history, he asked friend and fellow congressman Dan Quayle (R-Ind.) to travel to Guyana with him. Quayle declined.

While at Jonestown, Ryan’s entourage was privately approached by a handful of members who desired to leave Guyana. He was nearly stabbed in one domestic dispute. On Nov. 18, 1978, Ryan, his aides, a team of journalists, and the defectors were scheduled to return to America from the Port Kaituma airstrip. An ambush by Jones loyalists prevented their return. Ryan, a defecting Peoples Temple member, and three journalists were killed. Nine others were injured, including aide Jackie Speier, now a Democratic congresswoman from California.

As tragic as the scene at the airstrip was, no one could have imagined what was happening simultaneously at Jonestown. News reports leaked quickly. Something had gone drastically wrong at Jonestown and had resulted in over 200 deaths. In succeeding days, the number of reported deaths increased until it finally rested at over 900. The news media reported it as a mass suicide, but questions persisted regarding how massive the numbers of suicides actually were.

It was said that one-by-one, the Templars came forward to drink the cyanide-laced Kool-Aid (it was actually Flavor Aid) concocted for such a moment. The cause was the effective brainwashing of a religious fanatic.

Very few of the official theories proved to be conclusive, however.

Only seven autopsies were performed, and all seven were conducted after the bodies had been embalmed. “Probable cyanide poisoning” was listed as the cause of death in five of the seven bodies, yet only one showed any traces of cyanide. No cyanide could be detected in the Flavor Aid vat upon examination.

The body of Jones was one of the autopsied corpses. The cause of death was a gunshot wound to the head. Temple member Ann Moore had two causes of death, though it is unclear which occurred first. The autopsy listed a gunshot wound to her head, along with a massive amount of cyanide in her body tissues.

Guyanese physician Dr. Leslie Mootoo conducted cursory examinations of 100 bodies. Mootoo found that 83 of the 100 bodies had needle puncture wounds on the backs of their shoulders, suggesting that a majority of the victims were held down and injected against their will. Because they could not have legally chosen to die, all 260 children were considered murdered. In all, Mootoo estimated that over 700 of the bodies were victims of murder.

The idea of Jonestown as a “mass suicide” was perpetuated by Dr. Hardat Sukhdeo, a psychiatrist who was summoned to Guyana at the expense of the U.S. State Department. Sukhdeo was also an anti-cult deprogrammer. Dr. Stephen P. Hersh, then assistant director of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH), disagreed with Sukhdeo’s findings.

“The charges of brainwashing are clearly exaggerated,” Hersh told the Associated Press in 1978. “The concept of ‘thought control’ by cult leaders is elusive, difficult to define and even more difficult to prove. Because cult converts adopt beliefs that seem bizarre to their families and friends, it does not follow that their choices are being dictated by cult leaders.”

When Jones’s CIA case officer Dan Mitrione was murdered in Montevideo, Uruguay in 1970, the military personnel, or 201, file on Jones was purged, thus erasing any pre-1970 information the CIA may have gathered on Jones.

Author Jim Hougan of “JimHougan.com” offered his assessment of the fear that Ryan’s investigation struck in the establishment.

“Specifically, Jones was afraid that Ryan and the press would uncover evidence that the leftist founder of the Peoples Temple was for many years an asset of the FBI and the CIA,” Hougan wrote. “This fear was, I believe, mirrored in various precincts of the U.S. intelligence community, which worried that Ryan’s investigation would embarrass the CIA by linking Jones to some of the agency’s most volatile programs—including ‘mind-control’ studies and operations such as MK-ULTRA.”

New World Order Exposed, ThornJust as the horrific Charles Manson case figuratively ended the free-spirited 1960s, Jonestown ended the 1970s ideal that communal living was the backbone of a utopian existence. It also ended the rise of the super-preacher whose goal was the creation of an isolated group of parishioners. The 1980s ushered in a media that would chase evangelical superstars for their sexual and financial misdeeds, but even the televangelists’ most loyal followers would not have given their lives at the behest of their leader. The most devout Christians reflexively feared “another Jonestown.”

There is a mainstream version of the Jonestown story that is easy to understand. Its mythology reviles new religions and turns Jones’s church members into weak-minded devotees. To believe that Jonestown is understood only within these confining terms is a mistake.

There was a reason the edicts of Jones of Indiana were appealing. Jones’s own spook-filled, covert story is integral to Jonestown’s real history. To understand those complexities within the era in which they occurred is to understand the story in full. Jonestown, like the Patty Hearst kidnapping, is the effect of a COINTELPRO operation gone awry much more than it is a religious abyss.

S.T. Patrick holds degrees in both journalism and social studies education. He spent 10 years as an educator and now hosts the “Midnight Writer News Show.” His email is STPatrickAFP@gmail.com.

 




Bilderberg 2018 Wraps Up – 2020 US President Anointed?

As in years past, the Bilderberg Group meeting was attended by a U.S. presidential hopeful looking for the coveted “Bilderberg Boost.” Given President Trump’s anti-globalist, America-first actions when it comes to trade and funding of NATO, the elite controllers are clearly not interested in seeing him win a second term in office. 

By Mark Anderson

The secretive globalist group Bilderberg held its annual gathering at the five-star Torino Lingotto Congress resort in Turin, Italy, June 7-10. This writer and several activists from groups like We Are Change were actively covering the weekend confab, though anti-Bilderberg protests were nearly nonexistent and mainstream media coverage appears to have been the leanest it’s been in several years.

“I never heard any kind of demonstration group,” Swiss photographic correspondent Thomas Gasser, who reported from Turin. He added that the alternative media on hand, including We Are Change groups, Press for Truth, AFP, and a few others, constituted the only “resistance” outside the hotel where the Bilderbergers huddled.

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The meeting was heavily attended by national security and military personnel, including former CIA chief David Petraeus. According to the independent “Truthstream Media” news website, their presence suggests that more aggressive policies toward Russia are being considered, running an ever-greater risk of a military standoff, provoked largely by NATO’s increasing movement of military assets toward the Russian border.

In terms of the American domestic connection, the attendance of Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) is of particular interest. While about 6,000 acres of Colorado forest land was being swallowed up by wildfires, threatening about 2,000 homes as Bilderberg 2018 began, the two-term Democrat opted to remain in Turin with the Bilderbergers.

Hickenlooper’s media representative, Shelby Wieman, responded to an inquiry from this AFP writer, stating: “Gov. Hickenlooper took personal time to travel to Bilderberg (at his own expense). The governor has shown leadership and interest throughout his years in public service on many of the topics the conference addressed, including workforce development and the future of international trade.”

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What she didn’t mention was that Hickenlooper, a former Denver mayor, has considered running for president, which The Denver Post on March 12 announced with the headline, “Behind the scenes . . . Hickenlooper inches toward 2020 presidential race.”

Given the pervasive concern among the Bilderberg-affiliated intelligentsia that President Donald Trump is kicking the New World Order to the curb piece by piece—as evidenced by Trump thumbing his nose at the snooty G-7 and enacting certain tariffs to offset the massive trade deficits the U.S. has with Germany ($64 billion) and Italy ($32 billion)—the world managers who inhabit Bilderberg and its sibling groups should be expected to scan the horizon for a candidate to push against Trump in 2020.

The reason is simple: Trump has hampered NAFTA’s overhaul and firmly protested the U.S. paying way too much for NATO while member nations that run huge trade surpluses with the U.S. don’t even cover the benchmark 2%-of-GDP membership fee to be in the military alliance. He has also backed out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership and Paris climate accord. It’s clear the one-worlders don’t want to put up with Trump for two terms.

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Therefore, all eyes should be on Hickenlooper and whether he will receive the coveted “Bilderberg boost” and suddenly become a shooting political star “destined” to stop populist Trump from serving until 2024.

More evidence of this comes from vaguely worded topics such as “the U.S. before the midterms” and “the U.S. world leadership,” which are on the official 2018 Bilderberg “discussion” list, allude to a focus on presidential politics.

It’s worth noting that Bilderberg’s official topics list has never been all-inclusive and the make-up of the meetings kicks the door wide open for individual discussions, planning, and deal-making, apart from group activities.

After all, sizing up top-tier “presidential material,” going back to Bill Clinton’s debut at the 1991 Bilderberg meeting in Germany just before he began occupying the White House, is sometimes part of Bilderberg’s function.

Mark Anderson is AFP’s roving editor.




Globalist Groups Ramp Up Efforts to Quash Rise of Populism

The annual Bilderberg meeting has just wrapped up in Turin, Italy. Given this year’s program, it would appear this elite organization and its “lesser” allies are extremely concerned about the nearly worldwide rise of populism, a.k.a. anti-globalism.

By Mark Anderson

Bilderberg, historically seen as an isolated exercise in world power-brokering, has in recent times become the nerve center of a network of elitist organizations. A highly unusual twist this year, however, was that, as the 66th Bilderberg meeting in 64 years took place June 7-10 in Turin, Italy—with 128 participants from 23 countries—several other notable meetings convened at the same time.

The annual meeting of the G-7 nations—which typically meets before or after Bilderberg—instead met June 6-8 in Quebec.

The annual Forum on Global Cities was held June 6-8, sponsored by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs (CCGA) and the Bilderberg-connected Financial Times.

The NATO defense ministers’ meeting took place June 7-8 at the alliance’s Brussels headquarters, requiring NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg, an annual Bilderberg attendee, to shuttle between Italy and Belgium.

Just prior to this, the Trilateral Commission (TC) meeting was held in London Nov. 3-5, 2017, involving Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross—who attended Bilderberg last year in Virginia. The TC, a younger sibling of Bilderberg now in its 45th year, covered several topics that dovetail with this year’s Bilderberg agenda.

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Attendees of this year’s Bilderberg gathering who also took part in that TC meeting include: George Osborne, a former UK chancellor of the exchequer-turned-media magnate; Zanny Minton-Beddoes, a Bilderberg Steering Committee member who’s chief editor of the Economist magazine; and longtime European Central Bank chief and past Bilderberg attendee Jean Claude Trichet.

“The theme of the 2017 Trilateral Conference,” a TC summary stated, “was the causes of the rise of populism across the West—and what to do about it. The victory of Donald Trump and the UK’s vote for Brexit in 2016, the rise of authoritarian, nationalist governments in Poland and Hungary, and the ground gained by the radical right in elections in France, Austria, and elsewhere had some common roots.”

Bilderberg took up “populism in Europe” as its first listed topic for 2018, while the Chicago Forum on Global Cities stepped up its promotion of the “global cities” scheme, charting a course to unconstitutionally reorient government power away from the national level to the city level and, in the process, battle the rise of populism over grave concerns that an uncontrolled populist uprising that unites the right and left could further frustrate and even scuttle globalist designs.

The unmistakable tactic of using the global cities scheme to help undermine populism (i.e., nationalist governments that want out of the European Union and its suffocating dictates) was confirmed at Chicago Council on Global Affairs (CCGA) meetings over the last couple years, some of which this writer attended.

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The “Trilaterals” also expressed alarm over “increasing hostility to immigration, exemplified in the U.S. by the success of Trump’s slogan to ‘build this wall,’ in the UK by the Leave [Brexit] campaign’s successful attempt to put EU free movement rules at the center of the debate, and by Hungary and Poland’s refusal to take in asylum-seekers stuck in Italy and Greece. Another cause [of populism’s gains] was poor economic performance and frustration at high levels of inequality after 2008. Still another was the Internet and other forms of digital technology, which is both amplifying the voices of radicals and has the potential to bring about a big restructuring of the economy, which will create winners and losers.”

The 2018 Bilderberg agenda indicates that the Bilderbergers took the baton from their TC brethren concerning populism and at least four other topics among Bilderberg’s 12 agenda items: “The inequality challenge,” “free trade,” “U.S. world leadership,” and “the ‘post-truth’ world.”

“The ‘post-truth’ world,” which stems from the above TC statement about “digital technology . . . amplifying the voices of radicals,” apparently refers to the alternative media and activists who are challenging the mainstream media outlets and elite think tanks with which Bilderberg and its network partners collaborate.

For the record, 12 media entities represented nearly 10% of the attendees at the 2018 Bilderberg gathering—on hand to collaborate with the plutocratic cabal rather than uphold the public trust and objectively report on Bilderberg.

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The Bilderberg topics “U.S. world leadership” and “free trade” are highly reflective of not only the TC’s November meeting but also recent statements to a UK House of Lords committee by Council on Foreign Relations President Richard Haass. According to his testimony—which received no press coverage—the deep-seated power brokers that Haass represents are acutely concerned that President Donald Trump may pull out of, or drastically overhaul, NAFTA, the World Trade Organization, and other free-trade entities to the point where the U.S. will limit itself to bilateral trade deals and possibly end its leadership role in the trade, financial, and military arrangements put in place at the Bretton Woods accord in the waning days of World War II.

These nightmarish concerns expressed by Haass—ultimately meaning that Trump may flout the entire “rules-based international order” formulated at Bretton Woods—evidently have come true, at least in several respects, given Trump’s defiant demeanor at the G-7.

The G-7 was formerly the G-8 until Russia was excluded in 2014, as Western power brokers deemed it the new “enemy,” prompting the word “Russia” to appear on the list of Bilderberg topics several times, including this year. But now some pundits speculate that the G-7 could become the “G-6 + 1” as Trump becomes ever more antagonistic toward this economic grouping. Its ministers—expressing the very same “protectionist” concerns covered at the TC and Bilderberg meetings—are convinced that tariffs could only spell doom and spark trade wars, even though the Trump White House has insisted that instituting a 25% tariff on steel and 10% on aluminum is largely a sovereign, national security move, amid plans to revitalize the U.S. industrial base.

Mark Anderson is AFP’s roving editor.




Tesla File Releases Confirm FBI and Military Interest in Death Ray

Nearly 75 years after the death of pioneering genius Nikola Tesla, questions still abound as to why the government was first to be notified of his death, and why much of the information from his notebook, seized by the government, has yet to be made public. Not even the Tesla museum in Belgrade, Serbia has been allowed access to all of his materials, leading some to wonder which of Tesla’s ideas—such as the Death Ray—may indeed have been brought to fruition after his demise.

By S. T. Patrick

During the winter night of Jan. 7, 1943, Nikola Tesla, the idiosyncratic renaissance man of the scientific community, died in his room at the Hotel New Yorker. The eccentric Tesla had pioneered advances in alternating current (AC), experimented with the creation of a death ray weapon, and dreamed of wireless power grids.

By the time Tesla’s nephew, Yugoslav Ambassador to the U.S. Sava Kosanovic, arrived at the Hotel New Yorker the next morning, someone had gone through the effects in the room. Suspiciously missing was Tesla’s black notebook, which contained hundreds of pages—some that had “Government” transcribed onto them.

Government agents had been contacted and had quickly entered Tesla’s room to confiscate the relevant papers. Controversy still today surrounds the legitimacy of the confiscation. The technical analysis and housing of the papers was undertaken by the Justice Department’s Alien Property Custodian Office (APCO). The APCO should never have assumed jurisdiction over the “missing papers,” as Tesla had become a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1891.

The FBI has confirmed that Tesla’s papers were carefully inspected by naval intelligence officers and a radar scientist at MIT, yet the FBI clams that it “was not involved in searching Tesla’s effects, and it never had possession of his papers or any microfilm that may have been made of those papers.”

The MIT scientist responsible for scientific analysis of the papers was John G. Trump, Ph.D., the uncle of President Donald Trump.

Dr. Trump concluded that Tesla’s “thoughts and efforts during at least the past 15 years (of his life) were primarily of a speculative, philosophical, and somewhat promotional character,” but “did not include new, sound, workable principles or methods for realizing such results.”

Dr. Trump’s conclusions have not been accepted by the majority of Tesla’s biographers and fans over the past 75 years. They are reasonably suspicious that the government has not only used Tesla’s plans for invention but that many of Tesla’s most creative ideas have remained secret to this day. Trump alluded to his uncle’s knowledge during the 2016 campaign.

“(My uncle) would tell me many years ago about the power of weapons someday,” Trump told the media, “that the destructive force of these weapons would be so massive, that it’s going to be a scary world.”

Dr. Trump added that the papers were innocuous and dispelled any fear that they could be used by a World War II enemy of the United States.

Detractors of the “national security” theory cite the mainstream scientific community’s dismissal of Tesla in their argument. If Tesla was simply engaging in harmlessly theoretical, scientific hocus-pocus, why would the government have invaded his quarters immediately after he was found dead? Why were federal officials called before Tesla’s nephew, a Yugoslav diplomatic official, was contacted?

Questions regarding why federal officials were alerted and who knew to do so have spawned conspiracy theories about the death itself.

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Other questions focus on the here and now. For instance, does Tesla’s powerful particle-beam weapon—often termed a “Death Ray”—exist today? Theoretical physicists and alternative science investigators such as John Lear believe that is likely, despite the lack of official government acknowledgment.

According to biographer Marc Seifer in Wizard: The Life & Times of Nikola Tesla, Brig. Gen. L. C. Craigee and a group of military personnel at Wright Patterson Air Force Base believed very differently than Trump. Craigee was the first person ever to fly a jet plane for the military.

Seifer wrote, “(Craigee) said, ‘There’s something to this—the particle beam weapon is real.’ ”

Craigee and his staff were tasked with performing experiments using some of Tesla’s most classified papers. The results of the experiments were never made public, and the experiments ended. The Tesla papers used as the basis for the experiments vanished.

President Ronald Reagan believed in the efficacy of the particle beam weapon. An exaggerated version became the basis for his Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI, or “Star Wars”) program in the mid-1980s. Since the 1970s, fears had arisen that the Soviet Union had constructed a large particle beam weapon facility near the Sino-Soviet border.

Newly released FBI files detail how some FBI agents feared that Kosanovic may take possession of the papers solely to use them as an international bargaining chip. The FBI considered arresting Kosanovic to assure that the contents of the papers would not leave the United States.

The newest FBI releases also confirm that President Franklin Roosevelt and Vice President Henry Wallace were interested in Tesla’s ideas.

Also recently uncovered is the role Vannevar Bush played in the analysis of the Tesla papers. Bush was the head of the Manhattan Project and was a rumored member of Operation Majestic-12, which is alleged to have formed in 1947 to facilitate the recovery and investigation of UFOs.

When the FBI was ordered to return the papers to the Nikola Tesla Museum in Belgrade, Serbia, only 60 of the 80 trunks collected were sent. There are still files to be released—and some to be “found”—but what remains in the files, as in Tesla’s life, is shrouded in mystery.

S.T. Patrick holds degrees in both journalism and social studies education. He spent ten years as an educator and now hosts the “Midnight Writer News Show.” His email is STPatrickAFP@gmail.com.




Bilderberg Officially Announces Topics, Attendees

Early in the morning on June 5, the shadowy globalist group known as Bilderberg officially released the location of its 2018 gathering as well as the list of its attendees.

By AFP Staff

In advance of its annual gathering June 8-10, Bilderberg posted to its website a list of topics on its agenda as well as the attendees who will be there when the shadowy globalist group gathers this upcoming weekend.

Every year, behind locked and guarded doors, 120-140 of the western world’s most powerful business executives, bankers, financial speculators, bureaucrats, and politicians gather together in secret at a five-star resort somewhere in Europe or North America to discuss the most pressing issues of the day—and figure out ways to profit off of them.

This year, Bilderberg picked Turin, Italy for its meeting location. AFP exposed the secret meeting site months ago, but Bilderberg only officially confirmed this on June 5, in an official press release. The global group has not identified what resort it bought out to host the meeting, but early reports indicate it will likely be the NH Torino Lingotto Congress hotel in Turin. AFP attempted to book a room for the weekend of June 8-10, but the entire resort was booked solid, a good indication that this will be the place.

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To no one’s real surprise, a press release by the Bilderberg group identified the key topics of the confab, which will include U.S. politics in the age of President Donald Trump as well as the rise of populism.

Specifically, Bilderberg listed the following topics on its website:

  • Populism in Europe
  • The inequality challenge
  • The future of work
  • Artificial intelligence
  • The U.S. before midterms
  • Free trade
  • U.S. world leadership
  • Russia
  • Quantum computing
  • Saudi Arabia and Iran
  • The “post-truth” world
  • Current events

“As of today, 128 participants from 23 countries have confirmed their attendance. As ever, a diverse group of political leaders and experts from industry, finance, academia, and the media has been invited,” Bilderberg’s press release noted.

Regular attendees of Bilderberg will be there this year, including Henry Kissinger, Robert Rubin, and Lawrence Summers. Of note, however, is that James H. Baker from the Pentagon will be attending as well as PayPal founder and noted conservative libertarian Peter Thiel.

The full list of attendees can be found here.

In its press release, Bilderberg teased readers by acknowledging that attendees follow so-called “Chatham House rules,” meaning they are forbidden from discussing what transpires at the event. Only recently, however, has Bilderberg come out of the closet officially. For years, the group was deadly serious about maintaining its secrecy, enforcing a strict blackout on reports in the mainstream media.




Censorship Plague Infects America

Many are surprised to learn the true carriers of the exploding censorship plague is “Zionists hiding behind the banner of the neo-Bolshevik antifa movement.”

By Dr. Kevin Barrett

Albert Camus’s 1947 novel used The Plague as a metaphor for fascism. Today, the plague of fascist-style intolerance is once again spreading. But the carriers are not so much the paleoconservative nationalists that antifa hates as antifa itself . . . and the milieu from which it arises.

The core principle of fascism is crushing dissent. And it is antifa and its allies who are the worst censors and most fanatical enemies of free speech.

American Freedom Party Conference in Tennessee

On May 10, 1933, 40,000 pro-Nazi Germans gathered in Berlin to stage a gigantic book-burning bonfire. Exactly 85 years later, on May 10, 2018, philosopher and author Gilad Atzmon was barred from the Wil-Mar Community Center in Madison, Wisc. on the grounds that he was a supposed “Holocaust denier.”

In fact, Atzmon does not deny any facts about any of the many 20th century holocausts, but he insists that events in the past must be treated in an open, scholarly manner as opposed to as a religion. Atzmon opposes all forms of history laws. He prefers to remember his grandmother as a victim of the larger holocaust, World War II—which killed 60 million innocent people—rather than giving her special status because she, unlike more than 50 million other innocent victims of that horrific war, happened to be Jewish.

Like the 1930s German authors whose books were burned by Nazis, Atzmon is a dissident. A healthy society welcomes and embraces heretics like Atzmon. But our society is increasingly unhealthy, sickened by the plague of censorship, which festers in the stinking marshes of political correctness, then creeps out to strike down free thought.

Atzmon has been censored so many times he has lost count. When I informed him that his Madison venue had been abruptly canceled less than a week before the event, he told me, “It happens all the time.” Often the cancellations come on the very day of the event, making it difficult or impossible to find alternative locations.

Atzmon is censored because he criticizes Israel’s sacred cows and defends the rights of Palestinians. In this, he resembles the vast majority of censorship victims in America and Western Europe. Is it not odd that Americans and Europeans can critique and mock their own culture’s sacred symbols, yet are forced to kowtow to Israel’s?

I was recently banned from KBOO community radio in Portland, Ore. shortly before I was scheduled to appear. The witch-hunt that terrorized KBOO management into banning me was led by Zionists hiding behind the banner of the neo-Bolshevik antifa movement.

The previous year I was banned from the Berkeley Fellowship of Unitarians and Universalists after a hate campaign led by a “liberal Zionist” member. That was the first time I had ever had a speaking event canceled. Israel lobby groups had tried to cancel my events several times before that, but they had always failed. In 2015, they got me briefly banned from Canada, but it backfired when the ban was quickly lifted and I spoke in many Canadian cities. In several of those cities, B’nai B’rith Canada pressured the venue to cancel, but none ever did.

In Edmonton, B’nai B’rith lodged a hate speech complaint with the local police. After the first half of my talk, two plainclothes officers approached me and identified themselves as members of the Edmonton Police Department hate squad. They told me they had no problem with anything I had said. So I can now brag that my talks are “certified hate-free by the Edmonton PD hate squad.”

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Over the past three years, it seems that the censorship plague has metastasized and spread not only through community institutions like the Berkeley Unitarian church, the Wil-Mar Center in Madison, and KBOO radio but in even more virulent forms across the Internet. Many dozens of history books have been banned by Amazon. Facebook and Google are tweaking their algorithms to hide alternative media. An Internet publication I write for, “Veterans Today”—the most-read veterans publication in America—has been completely banned from Facebook without any explanation. The most likely reason: offending Zionist sensibilities.

Academia is also affected. Professors who question Zionist propaganda, like Anthony Hall, Steven Sulaita, and Joy Karega, have been the focus of hysterical witch-hunts. I recently interviewed Alan Sabrosky about censorship. Sabrosky, an ex-Marine officer and former director of strategic studies at the U.S. Army War College, is on record stating that “9/11 was a Mossad operation, period.” He told me that the ultimate form of censorship is assassination and voiced his suspicions about the untimely deaths of two great AMERICAN FREE PRESS journalists, Michael Collins Piper and Victor Thorn.

AFP is the last print publication braving the Zionist censorship hurricane. Writing for this newspaper may be a dangerous job, but somebody’s got to do it.

Kevin Barrett, Ph.D., is an Arabist-Islamologist scholar and one of America’s best-known critics of the War on Terror. From 1991 through 2006, Dr. Barrett taught at colleges and universities in San Francisco, Paris, and Wisconsin. In 2006, however, he was attacked by Republican state legislators who called for him to be fired from his job at the University of Wisconsin-Madison due to his political opinions. Since 2007, Dr. Barrett has been informally blacklisted from teaching in American colleges and universities. He currently works as a nonprofit organizer, public speaker, author, and talk radio host.




Big Media Lies About Nixon, Trump

President Donald Trump’s battles with special counsel Robert Mueller investigation are being compared to President Richard Nixon’s firing of special prosecutor Archibald Cox in the Saturday Night Massacre. But recent comparisons between Trump and Nixon are based on historical fallacies promoted by mainstream media and Hollywood.

By S.T. Patrick

Evaluating CNN’s recent coverage of the predictably named “Russiagate” story reminds informed viewers that lazy journalism and bad history can exist, even on the hallowed airwaves of what the mainstream media regrettably defines as the upper echelon of modern news.

In its attempt to compare President Donald Trump’s tensions with special counsel Robert Mueller to Richard Nixon’s October 1973 firing of special prosecutor Archibald Cox, CNN has enlisted Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein to validate its flawed hypothesis. Woodward and Bernstein famously detailed their Watergate era reporting in the 1974 book All the President’s Men.

Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman’s likeable big screen portrayals of “Wood-stein” helped carve for The Washington Post darlings a permanent place in the journalistic pantheon of Big Media. Watergate revisionists such as Len Colodny staunchly deny that the Trump-Nixon comparison, as well as Woodward and Bernstein’s role in the original story, are legitimate.

Colodny, the author of Silent Coup: The Removal of a President, has tangled with Woodward and the Watergate story for close to 30 years. Colodny’s work documents a thesis that Watergate was not about a break-in at all. There were break-ins, which Colodny believes were ordered by Nixon’s White House Counsel John Dean, but the real story of Watergate centers on a shadow government set up by Nixon early in his presidency that inadvertently allowed Gen. Alexander Haig to climb the ranks of Nixon appointees. When Nixon became vulnerable as a result of the Watergate break-ins, Haig then ran a shadow government whose primary goal was to oust Nixon.

In a Feb. 10 piece for CNN.com, Woodward and Bernstein called Trump’s battle with Mueller “an eerily similar confrontation” to Nixon’s firing of Cox, now termed the “Saturday Night Massacre.” The constant comparison of Trump to Nixon has become an outlandish obsession. What Americans are getting isn’t Trump; it’s CNN’s Trump. And the Nixon being portrayed isn’t the historical Nixon, either; it’s Woodward and Bernstein’s Nixon.

An example is the opening line of Gloria Borger’s March 3 CNN.com article, “The Great Unraveling: Trump’s Allies Are Really Worried About Him.” Ms. Borger opens the article, writing, “Not since Richard Nixon started talking to portraits on the walls of the West Wing has a president seemed so alone against the world.”

That Nixon is the one portrayed in Woodward and Bernstein’s second book, The Final Days (1976), the story of Nixon’s final year in office. It shows a president that is crazed, neurotic, crying, praying, hyper-paranoid, and frothing with every emphatic syllable.

Borger’s source is simply called “One source—who is a presidential ally.” Woodward popularized the use of an unnamed source, the most famous of which became the euphemistically named Deep Throat. Though Woodward outed FBI Associate Director Mark Felt as Deep Throat in 2005, some researchers still believe he was a composite character.

Others have for decades believed Deep Throat was Haig, who, not so coincidentally, was also the hero of The Final Days. Haig tested the bounds of disloyalty and illegality in ways that Woodward and Bernstein spun as saving the country from a president that had flown off the rails.

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Though Woodward told Colodny in 1989 that he had “never met or talked to Haig until sometime in the spring of ’73,” Colodny’s research unearthed a biography that contradicted Woodward’s claim.
Colodny confirmed that Navy Lt. Woodward in 1969 and 1970 manned the Pentagon’s secret communications room. In that position, Woodward often transmitted back channel messages to and from Nixon and Henry Kissinger. During this time, Woodward also delivered messages to Haig, Kissinger’s deputy at the National Security Council.

When Colodny and co-author Robert Gettlin wrote that Woodward had briefed Haig as early as 1969, Woodward fired back. “I defy you to produce somebody who says I did the briefing,” Woodward said. “It’s just, it’s not true.”

Colodny and Gettlin confirmed the Woodward-Haig relationship with two high-level sources, Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird and Woodward’s own former commanding officer, Adm. Thomas Moorer, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

This is also in direct contrast to how All the President’s Men—the book and the film—portrayed Woodward. He had worked closely with important Nixon administration appointees, despite the film portraying him as a lucky, young reporter whose hard work and shoe-leather muckraking led him to stumble upon the story of the decade.

Bernstein, in his recent CNN appearances, has had even harsher words for Trump. “We have no reason to believe almost anything that Donald Trump says,” Bernstein told CNN. “What is so extraordinary about him and his presidency is the incessant, compulsive, continual lying. . . . We’ve never had a president who lies like this . . . even Nixon.”

Bernstein then reinforced the comparison to Anderson Cooper on “AC360.” In comparing Trump’s rejection of Russian collusion to Nixon’s denials of a Watergate cover-up, Bernstein said, “Ironically enough, you’re dealing with the same allegations in some way.”

With Woodward acting as the smooth scrutinizer and Bernstein as the hit man, CNN has passionately pushed the Trump-Nixon comparison at every turn. Colodny, a self-admitted liberal Democrat, is turned off by it. If Woodward lied about his relationship with Haig, lied about his early ties to Nixon appointees, lied about the complete source list for the Deep Throat information, and lied about giving briefings at the White House, Colodny believes any comparison Woodward and Bernstein make comparing Russiagate to Watergate is both self-serving and inapposite.

In an interview with this writer, Colodny denied that any comparison between the two presidents should be made. However, it may be worth pondering whether there is a valid comparison to be made regarding a more modern Silent Coup thesis itself. Are establishment insiders plotting Trump’s demise with the aiding and abetting of those he trusts? Could Trump’s Haig be a frequent visitor to the West Wing today? And will it take close to 20 years for revisionist researchers to uncover it all?

S.T. Patrick holds degrees in both journalism and social studies education. He spent 10 years as a respected educator and now hosts the “Midnight Writer News” show. You may email him at STPatrickAFP@gmail.com.




Hearst Kidnapping Was CIA Op

The author of a new book has powerfully countered CNN propaganda, boldly challenging the accepted mainstream version of “the most notorious American kidnapping since the baby of Charles and Anne Lindbergh was taken in 1932.” In doing so, Brad Schreiber exposes how the U.S. undermines dissident groups through revealing the real history of the Symbionese Liberation Army’s kidnapping of media mogul heiress Patty Hearst. 

By S. T. Patrick

Political kidnappings are rare in North America. More common in Latin America, South Asia, and Africa, they are most often used to gain political concessions, commodity control, money, notoriety or a combination of the four. Someone who may be valuable to a wealthy and powerful entity is kidnapped in exchange for something that is of value to the kidnappers.

Patricia (Patty) Campbell Hearst was an heir to the publishing fortune of William Randolph Hearst. She was valuable. The Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA) and their leader, Donald DeFreeze, wanted to make a statement that would instantly gain them notoriety through the media, a business the Hearsts knew very well.

When Hearst, a sophomore at the University of California-Berkeley, was kidnapped by members of the SLA on Feb. 4, 1974 there was reason to believe the motives were political and monetary. When no ransom demand was given to California authorities, the media began reporting the story as a political kidnapping. It quickly became the most notorious American kidnapping since the baby of Charles and Anne Lindbergh was taken in 1932. As the story unfolded, the characters, events, and history behind the kidnapping became even more bizarre than what was being reported.

In Revolution’s End: The Patty Hearst Kidnapping, Mind Control, and the Secret History of Donald DeFreeze and the SLA, author Brad Schreiber boldly challenges what is still the accepted mainstream version of the story. It is the mainstream version that was featured on CNN’s recent docuseries, “The Radical Story of Patty Hearst.” In challenging the CNN version of the story with documents and archival interviews that have been available since researcher Dick Russell revealed them in 1976, Schreiber is also challenging the work of CNN’s legal analyst, Jeffrey Toobin, on whose work the CNN series was based.

While Toobin’s work focuses largely on Hearst, Schreiber’s research delves deeper into the history and ideologies of the SLA and DeFreeze, both of which stem from California Gov. Ronald Reagan’s attempts at infiltrating left-wing political groups. California’s infiltration project was led by Reagan’s attorney general, Evelle Younger, as well as the CIA.

Three months before the Hearst kidnapping, the SLA had been responsible for killing Marcus Foster, the first black superintendent of the Oakland Unified School District. The killing baffled journalists and officials. The SLA had come to prominence as a radical left-wing group concerned mainly about the plight of black Americans. The Foster murder created a rift between the SLA and the Black Panthers, which had formed in Oakland in 1966. It is senseless unless you view the rift as an intentionally created one, as Schreiber does.

While DeFreeze was incarcerated at Vacaville Prison, he became associated with the Black Cultural Association (BCA), a group led by UC-Berkeley professor and CIA asset Colston Westbrook. The BCA would bring white, radical students into the prison to help facilitate political and educational discussions with black inmates housed in a wing used and funded by the CIA for mind control and sociological experimentation projects.

It was through the BCA that Hearst first met the incarcerated DeFreeze. Using a fraudulent ID of friend Mary Alice Siem in a time when prison rules were much more lax, she then began sending money to DeFreeze. Hearst and two of Westbrook’s other volunteers, Patricia Soltysik and Nancy Ling Perry, also engaged in sexual activity with DeFreeze while at Vacaville. DeFreeze and other prisoners targeted by Westbrook were placed on heavy doses of medication.

American Freedom Party Conference in Tennessee

DeFreeze was offered a deal by the California Department of Corrections and the CIA. He would be released (portrayed as an escape) in exchange for starting a phony left-wing group—the SLA—and working in chaotic opposition to the goals of the Black Panthers and the New Left. Westbrook would serve as the control agent for DeFreeze, who had previously been used as an informant to set up the Black Panthers for the Los Angeles Police Department.

After DeFreeze left prison, he was reunited with Soltysik and Perry, who became SLA members. The group’s spurious origins were known by Westbrook and DeFreeze, but not by its white, radical members.

“None of the core 10 white followers of the SLA ever knew that DeFreeze was working for the state,” Schreiber said in an interview with this writer. “They believed it was a radical group, and they believed in revolution. They thought America was a racist country . . . and they thought that the Vietnam War was an immoral war. They were following a black prisoner . . . and they had no idea he was setting them up. . . . They were following DeFreeze blindly.”

According to Schreiber, the kidnapping of Hearst was undertaken by the SLA because DeFreeze felt abandoned by Hearst and had animus toward her. It was, therefore, a personal kidnapping and was neither political nor random. Schreiber believes that Hearst did not expect the kidnapping, nor did she take a willing part in it.

Aside from DeFreeze, the SLA members treated Hearst well. She was already politically radical. DeFreeze employed the use of drugs, intimidation, and sex with other members to mentally coerce Hearst into participating with the SLA in the Hibernia Bank robbery and other activities.

Schreiber is often indignant at the mainstream’s focus on the Hearst angle in the story. Reagan, Younger, and the CIA bear responsibility for the programs by which false left-wing groups were created in California. One of those groups, the SLA, murdered a school superintendent before engaging in a robbery of a San Francisco bank. In a later shootout with the LAPD, six SLA members were killed.

The focus of the story, to Schreiber, is the infiltration of the left, the corruption of the California Department of Corrections, the murder of school superintendent Foster, and the sad deaths of the group’s committed believers.

Schreiber’s point of view is a reminder that the truth of history can be found through dissecting the story of someone the mainstream media views as a minor character. Schreiber found both the truth and the true tragedy of the story within the biographies of the supposedly extraneous figures that surrounded Patty Hearst in 1974 rather than through biographies of Hearst herself.

S.T. Patrick holds degrees in both journalism and social studies education. He spent ten years as an educator and now hosts the “Midnight Writer News” show. His email is STPatrickAFP@gmail.com.




Why Martin Luther King Distrusted Jesse Jackson

Famed civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and many in his organization were leery of the upstart Jesse Jackson, who they saw as race baiting and conflict driven. In addition, everyone else at the SCLC was a minister. Jackson’s unenthusiastic and short-lived attendance at seminary made clear he was not interested in pastoring a flock, yet he found a way to work the system and put the “Rev.” in front of his name. Surely worst, however, in Jackson’s never-ending pursuit of self-promotion was his callous disregard for Dr. King’s honor at the time of his assassination.

By S.T. Patrick

This April marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorials will be held, scholarships will be dedicated, legislative resolutions will be passed, books will be published, and documentaries will be released. The tragic events of April 1968 included both the killing of King and the false blame attributed to James Earl Ray. Many may have forgotten that King’s death also marked the dubious rise of “Reverend” Jesse Jackson.

King had accepted an invitation to speak at the church of Rev. Clay Evans on the south side of Chicago in 1966, where Jackson, having met King in Selma, Ala. in 1965 and always one to seize an opportunity, pushed himself closer to King throughout the visit. He picked King up at the airport and hobnobbed with his team enough to earn a staff job and an annual salary of $3,000 from the King organization.

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Despite his official inclusion on King’s staff, King soon found himself unimpressed with aspects of Jackson’s personality. He was especially troubled with Jackson’s reflexive ability to escalate encounters with government officials, police departments, and innocent bystanders.

As Kenneth R. Timmerman, the author of Shakedown: Exposing the Real Jesse Jackson, wrote, “King left Chicago profoundly suspicious of Jackson’s taste for self-promotion.”

No matter how hard Jackson may have worked to get to the front of the line of luminaries within the late 1960s civil rights movement, he lacked one thing that King’s closest confidants possessed: Jackson wasn’t a man of the cloth.

“Dr. King told Jesse that everybody who worked in the movement was a minister,” said Hurley Green, a former speechwriter, columnist, and friend of Jackson, “so Jesse went to seminary for six months, dropped out, and called himself a minister.”

Jackson’s limited time spent at the Chicago Theological Seminary (CTS) was verified by Chaplain A. Knighton Stanley, who stated that Jackson was not committed to the church nor had he discovered a true vocation. Jackson had even failed to fulfill the required class on sermon writing and delivery that one would think would be important for someone truly interested in the ministry and communicating with his flock.

Jackson later clarified why he attended CTS for the time that he did. “I decided to go to seminary to learn how to do without the law to change society, to change it in deeper ways,” he said.

The distrust and exasperation King had with Jackson continued through 1968. In Memphis, one week before the assassination, King made a decision to cancel participation in a demonstration that he believed could turn violent. Jackson, in front of King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) staff, boisterously disagreed with King’s cancellation of the march.

Angry at Jackson’s response, King walked out of the meeting. The team neared the breaking point with Jackson as they, as Timmerman wrote, “mistrusted his ambition, his audacity, and his refusal to be a team player.” They could have never imagined the depths to which Jackson would sink a week later.

An Act of State, by William F. Pepper

An Act of State: The Execution of Martin Luther King, by William F. Pepper: On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King was in Memphis supporting a worker strike. By nightfall, army snipers were in position, military officers were on a nearby roof with cameras, and Lloyd Jowers had been paid to remove the gun after the fatal shot was fired. When the dust had settled, King had been hit and a clean-up operation was set in motion—James Earl Ray was framed, the crime scene was destroyed, and witnesses were killed. William Pepper, attorney and friend of King, has conducted a 30-year investigation into his assassination. In 1999, Lloyd Jowers and other co-conspirators were brought to trial in a civil action suit on behalf of the King family. Seventy witnesses set out the details of a conspiracy that involved J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI, Richard Helms and the CIA, the military, Memphis police, and organized crime. The jury took an hour to find for the King family. In An Act of State, you finally have the truth before you—how the U.S. government shut down a movement for social change by stopping its leader dead in his tracks. Get the updated version of William F. Pepper’s tour de force (softcover, 350 pages, $22 plus $4 S&H inside the U.S.) from the AFP Online Store.

As King lay dying on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, Jackson claims—and has claimed since 1968—that he was the last to speak to King and cradled King’s head as he died. Jackson then appeared on Chicago television the next day, wearing a bloody turtleneck that he said was stained with the blood of the fallen civil rights leader. King associates have always challenged Jackson’s self-described role on that day as fabricated and distasteful. Jackson, in reality, was in the parking lot below. Critics also claim that Jackson went so far as to wipe King’s blood on his shirt for the sole purpose of going on television to build his own legend.

After King’s death, the leadership of the SCLC fell into the hands of MLK’s chosen successor, Ralph Abernathy. Jackson almost immediately clashed with Abernathy, about whom Jackson famously exclaimed to biographer Eddie Stone, “I never listen to that ni**er!”

Abernathy isn’t the only civil rights leader to incur the wrath of Jackson’s ambition. There have also been conflicts with Minister Louis Farrakhan, Rev. Al Sharpton, and former Atlanta mayor Andrew Young. If anyone challenged Jackson’s stranglehold on the role of civil rights media darling and ace pundit, Jackson viewed them as a threat.

Jackson did eventually become a minister, of sorts. CTS offered him a master’s degree in divinity in 2000. The only requirement for such was that he engage in a two-hour discussion with a professor on the topics of abortion and the death penalty. Sitting on the board of CTS in 2000 was Jesse Jackson Jr., the young Democratic member of Congress.

Jackson had used the title of “Reverend” since his early days as a community organizer, even without an education in theology. He rose to stardom on the basis of a history with Dr. King that was contentious and in many cases untrue. He stayed in power by extorting companies out of donations with race-based threats. And he has built an enemies list—white, black, and international—as long as anyone in contemporary American history. He keeps hope alive that his legacy will someday find itself parallel to King’s, yet like his coalition, his greatest dreams may only be found somewhere over the rainbow.

S.T. Patrick holds degrees in both journalism and social studies education. He spent ten years as an educator and now hosts the “Midnight Writer News” Show. His email is STPatrickAFP@gmail.com.




Read Newly Released House Memo Blasting FBI Here

Regular readers of AFP know that U.S. law enforcement regularly abuse their powers to investigate and arrest everyday Americans. It is no small comfort that law enforcement at the highest levels now stands accused of committing similar contentious acts against a presidential contender who was a threat to the establishment.

By AFP Staff

On Feb. 2, the House Intelligence Committee released a secret memo alleging the Justice Department abused its powers to surveil the Trump campaign.

As per the law, President Donald Trump was required to authorize the release. He could have chosen to redact key parts, but the billionaire president decided to release it in its entirety so the public could see for themselves the abusive process.

The memo was originally compiled by House Intelligence Committee staff, led by Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), from classified documents provided by the Department of Justice.

The Justice Department and the FBI both objected to its release but the House and the president overruled them. Read the memo by clicking the link here.




50 Years Later, We Don’t Know Who Killed Martin Luther King

At this 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., mainstream media has once again presented the “open-and-shut case” assumption that he was murdered by James Earl Ray. Yet numerous respected assassination researchers as well as members of King’s family have long disputed this establishment story. They suggests that, instead, Ray was merely a patsy.

By S.T. Patrick

Even through the latest JFK assassination file releases, the questions regarding the life and death of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. still penetrate the American conscience 50 years later. King was shot outside the Lorraine Hotel in Memphis, Tenn. on April 4, 1968. James Earl Ray, a fugitive from the Missouri State Penitentiary, was captured two months later at Heathrow Airport in London. Within nine months, Ray had been convicted, legally and publicly, of assassinating King and sentenced to 99 years. He died in prison in 1998 at the age of 70.

Though the case was closed in the minds of the mainstream media and the historical establishment, doubts existed in the minds of dedicated researchers who never accepted their final conclusions. Like Lee Harvey Oswald and Sirhan Sirhan—the supposed assassins of John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy, respectively—Ray seemed to be a patsy. Ray later confirmed that he was a patsy to a mysterious figure named “Raoul.”

More than Oswald and Sirhan, Ray was an archetypal figure tailor-made for the divisive times in which the murder occurred. Even the civil rights era’s most palpable black leader was killed by a racist Southerner, many thought.

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Some of the most respected assassination researchers of the late 20th century believe that Ray was innocent of the King murder. Attorney and author Mark Lane helped free witness Grace Stephens from a sanitarium. Stephens was at Bessie’s Boarding House with her common-law husband, Charlie Stephens, when King was shot at the Lorraine. Ms. Stephens clearly saw a man running from the communal bathroom after shots were fired. When urged to testify, she refused to testify that the man quickly exiting the bathroom was Ray. Though Mr. Stephens was drunk, without his glasses, and did not see the man clearly, he fingered Ray as that man. His testimony was then used to extradite Ray from England. Ms. Stephens was sent to a sanitarium.

Dr. William F. Pepper was accused assassin Ray’s last attorney. He exhausted every option available in an attempt to gain Ray a trial before his death. Pepper still adamantly believes that Ray was never given the trial constitutionally promised to him. In 1969, Tennessee officials and Ray’s first attorney, Percy Foreman, intimidated Ray into a guilty plea. Pepper later won a televised mock trial for Ray in 1993 when the jury returned a “not guilty” verdict.

As it turns out, King’s greatest enemies did not reside in the Southern United States at all. J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI was targeting King throughout the Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson presidencies—away from Kennedy’s reach and with active participation from Johnson. The newly released JFK assassination files contain a 20-page FBI analysis of King that portrays him in the harshest light. The document alleges ties to communist influences, usage of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) as “a tax dodge,” and philandering of the highest order.

In 1964 a package arrived at the home of King and his wife, Coretta. The package contained various tapes compromising to King’s marriage, as well as a letter that appeared to urge him toward suicide. “There is only one thing left for you to do. You know what it is,” the letter read. The package was sent anonymously, though a Senate committee later confirmed that it had been sent by the FBI.

An Act of State, William F. Pepper
Updated version is now available from the American Free Press Bookstore!

Unlike the Kennedy family, which has remained publicly quiet on the subject of the JFK and RFK assassins, the King family has been both opinionated and active. Since 1997, Coretta Scott King and youngest son Dexter have worked with Pepper in an attempt to free Ray, literally until Ray’s death and historically thereafter. Inspired by Pepper’s book An Act of State: The Execution of Martin Luther King, King’s daughter Yolanda and cousin Isaac Ferris were also on board to find the truth of the assassination. In 1997, Dexter King, with the aid of Pepper, even visited Ray in prison.

When, at a later wrongful death trial, a jury affirmed that they believed “others, including governmental agencies, were parties to this conspiracy,” Ms. King invoked her late husband’s words: “My husband once said that the moral arch of the universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

The civil court ruling prompted an 18-month investigation by then-Attorney General Janet Reno’s Justice Department. It ruled that a conspiracy to kill Dr. King was neither proven nor present.

As the 50th anniversary of the assassination approaches in April, media attention will increase. The History Channel, Discovery Channel, and the three-letter national networks will inevitably convict Ray once more.

Skeptical authors like Phillip Nelson will release the revisionist counterpoint. Nelson’s Who Really Killed MLK? The Case Against Lyndon B. Johnson and J. Edgar Hoover will be available in April.

As Donald Sutherland’s character says to Kevin Costner’s “Jim Garrison” in Oliver Stone’s “JFK”: “Kings are killed, Mr. Garrison. Politics is power. Nothing more.” Whether or not the FBI dossiers on King are to be believed—credible information exists that at least some of them are—the question of assassination and the guilt of Ray are still dubious at best. But when we allow political assassination to go unchecked, the spine of democracy weakens and the core threatens to crumble.

S.T. Patrick holds degrees in both journalism and social studies education. He spent ten years as an educator and now hosts the “Midnight Writer News” show. His email is STPatrickAFP@gmail.com.




Pentagon Officially Confirms Government’s Interest in UFOs

The Pentagon has officially admitted its Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program, a long-term government investigation into the UFO phenomenon. Notable UFOlogists have written for decades about government programs including Majestic-12 and Project Blue Book. Given this acknowledgement by the official secret-keepers, are we closer to knowing the truth about Area 51 and possible extraterrestrial encounters? 

By S.T. Patrick

After decades of denials, chuckles, and ad hominem attacks on anyone questioning whether or not the United States government has engaged in the study of UFOs, the silence is broken.

Until now, it was easy to label amateur and professional UFOlogists as “the tinfoil hat crew” or “crackpots.” However, the Pentagon has now officially confirmed the existence of a $22 million program that collected, analyzed, and categorized “anomalous aerospace threats”—or “UFOs” in the more common vernacular. According to information released in late December by The Washington Post, the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program was just another instance of what has been a long-term government investigation into the UFO phenomenon.

The investigations date back to the 1950s and 1960s, as UFOlogists such as Stanton Friedman, a nuclear physicist by trade, have known for years. Friedman, educated at the University of Chicago, has written Crash at Corona (1992) about the Roswell incident and Top Secret/Majic (1997) about the Majestic 12 (MJ-12) program that was formed by an executive order signed by Harry Truman.

According to Stanton, who in 1984 received anonymous documents detailing the MJ-12 roster and activities, the program was created in direct response to the Roswell, N.M. UFO crash of 1947. Created to investigate and recover alien (unknown) spacecraft, MJ-12 included such luminaries as Sidney Souers and Hoyt Vandenberg, the first two directors of central intelligence; Roscoe Hillenkoetter, the first director of the CIA; James Forrestal, the first secretary of defense; Vannevar Bush, who headed the Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) during World War II; Donald Menzel, a noted skeptic who Friedman claims was a true believer, and others.

IRS Loses Cases

To his credit, Friedman has uncovered as many hoaxes as he has validated incidents he believes to be real. Some of the MJ-12 documents originally made available to Friedman were ones he invalidated as hoaxes. That, however, does not deter his avid belief that other documents, as well as the program itself, were real. Friedman points out that it is a common practice in top-secret intelligence to include a smattering of hoax documents alongside real ones.

MJ-12 was not the only government project looking at UFOs after Roswell. Project Blue Book was a series of United States Air Force studies on unidentified flying objects. It lasted from 1952 to 1970. By the time it had ceased, Project Blue Book had collected 12,618 UFO reports, most that the National Reconnaissance Office characterized as flights of formerly secret reconnaissance planes such as the U-2 and the A-12.

Annie Jacobsen, a former contributing editor to The Los Angeles Times’ magazine, is an author specializing in what has been called “war, weapons, security, and secrets.” She has written Area 51: An Uncensored History of America’s Top Secret Military Base (2015), Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America (2014), and The Pentagon’s Brain: An Uncensored History of DARPA, America’s Top Secret Military Research Agency (2015), a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in History.

Ms. Jacobsen tackled the UFO question regarding Area 51 in a way that may be more controversial than the alien back-engineering theory that has persisted since KLAS-TV Las Vegas journalist George Knapp popularized the phrase “Area 51” while interviewing Bob Lazar in 1989. Lazar claims to have back-engineered alien spacecraft while briefly working at Area 51.

Ms. Jacobsen’s thesis is that Area 51, located in the Nevada desert, has been a vital site for national security and weapons development since its inception. Stealth technology, such as the CIA’s A-12, was developed at Area 51. Early U-2 tests were also conducted at the base. Area 51, Ms. Jacobsen writes, was strategically important during the era of Sputnik, the Bay of Pigs, the lunar landing, and the Vietnam War. It was where America’s most important espionage projects were tested and analyzed. Back-engineering was performed at Area 51, Ms. Jacobsen details, but it was a Soviet MiG and not an alien space craft.

Ms. Jacobsen likens the Roswell crash to the opening shot of the Cold War. She dismisses the alien theories altogether while hypothesizing that the supposed aliens recovered outside of Roswell were actually human guinea pigs, the result of American experimentation gone awry. The UFO rumors, then, were cover stories for the grisly experiments that were conducted on humans.

The official line was to deny even the existence of Area 51, though warning signs, motion- and sound-detection devices, and Wackenhut security lined its outer rim. Government interest in UFOs, Roswell, and Area 51 has leaked in both news and biography. Upon retirement, former CIA director Adm. Roscoe Hillenkoetter served on the board of directors of the National Investigations Committee for Aerial Phenomena (NICAP), which lobbied against government cover-ups of UFO information from the 1950s through the 1970s.

What we now know is that Area 51, the base also known as “Dreamland,” has been used since the dawn of the Cold War to test aviation that pushed the limits of sight, sound, and detection. Though the Nevada desert can be barren, desolate, and dry, something is, indeed, out there.

S.T. Patrick holds degrees in both journalism and social studies education. He spent ten years as an educator and now hosts the “Midnight Writer News” show. His email is STPatrickAFP@gmail.com.