Hillary Clinton’s Poor-Mouth Routine Falls on Deaf Ears

28_29_Hillary

Former first lady says she and Bill were broke at end of Bill’s term as president despite signing $8 million book advance shortly before they left the White House—with the furniture.

By Victor Thorn —

Like a modern-day Marie Antoinette sarcastically urging the poor and starving peasants in the streets to eat cake, Hillary Clinton has been crying poormouth, in spite of having amassed, along with her husband, Bill, a fortune worth over $109 million in the past 14 years.

During a June 25 interview, Tim Graham, director of media analysis at the Media Research Center, told this newspaper, “Hillary Clinton telling ABC’s Diane Sawyer that they were ‘dead broke’ when leaving the White House is beyond ludicrous. These are people that are millionaires a hundred times over.”

Graham added, “Hillary should meet with assembly line workers and explain how she makes $200,000 per speech. You can’t convince average Americans that you’re poor after pulling down these kinds of six-figure sums.”

Providing one other essential point, Graham stated to this reporter: “Hillary accepted an $8 million book advance before she ever joined the Senate in 2001. To say she was dead-broke is simply not true. The reason they were in debt was because of legal defense bills.”

On June 25 during an AMERICAN FREE PRESS interview, Bob Porto of the Arkansas Pulaski County Tea Party carried this assertion a step further.

Hillary and Bill Trilogy

“People don’t buy this woe-is-me approach,” he said. “The Clintons were in debt because they had to pay off the legal costs incurred from lawsuits associated with Bill’s philandering.”

Being an Arkansas resident, Porto remembers well the shenanigans that transpired decades ago.

“When Bill was governor, the Clintons never owned any property in Arkansas. They always fed off the state’s breast milk. They lived off political welfare. Now, Hillary has decided to cash in. I think in her mind Hillary looks at all the time she supposedly sacrificed for our country. Now she has to make up for it financially. The big question is: considering all of Hillary and Bill’s political connections, what did they have to offer to get $109 million in return?”

Sylvia Curry of the Arkansas White Hall Tea Party Patriots also spoke with AFP on June 25.

She began: “I could tell you some stories about those two when they lived in Arkansas. Imagine the snobbishness to infer that they’re poor when Hillary owns two mansions and wants $225,000 for an upcoming speech at UNLV. Yesterday [June 24] Bill Clinton said that he and Hillary make it a point at least once a month to visit the grocery store on weekends and speak with regular people.”

After laughing at the absurdity of this proposition, Curry continued, “Do you remember when Hillary stole publicly-owned furniture from the White House and had to be forced into returning it? Then, a few days ago their daughter Chelsea suggested that she doesn’t care about money. If I lived in a $6 million apartment and made $600,000 a year from NBC News, I wouldn’t care about money either. What do these statements say about the Clinton’s perspective on the real America? I think Hillary’s arrogance has turned plenty of people against her.”

Even Hillary’s most ardent supporters are vexed by her gaffes.

Former South Carolina Democratic Party chairman Dick Harpootlian lamented on June 23: “I don’t know whether it’s that she’s been ‘Madame Secretary’ for so long, but [Hillary’s] generating an imperial image. She’s been living 30, going on 40 years, with somebody bringing her coffee every morning. It’s more ‘Downtown Abbey’ [a television show about England’s Royal Family] than it is America.”

Victor Thorn

Victor Thorn is a hard-hitting researcher, journalist and author of over 40 books.

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