How Disinformation Becomes History

How Disinformation Becomes History

By Michael Collins Piper

In the premiere issue of 2013 in AMERICAN FREE PRESS, we reflected on the proliferation of rumors popping up in the “alternative media” based on misinterpretation of sloppy reporting by the mainstream press about current events. This week we examine other stories—deliberate forgeries—that have taken on a life of their own, contributing much confusion within what is known as “the truth movement.” Many such rumors are iconic and good people have invested much energy promoting these legends. But legends they are.

In some cases, well-meaning folks thought that by putting those frauds into circulation they were helping impart greater truths people needed to
know.

Other stories had less than benevolent motivations behind them. They were concocted for the very purpose ofmuddying the waters of serious research into major issues of our time.

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Here are some notable forgeries that bear mention:

• The spurious “interview” with Harold Wallace Rosenthal in which he unveils “insider” secrets of the Zionist conspiracy;

• The supposedly “secret speech” by Rabbi Emanuel Rabinovich in Budapest in 1952;

• The long-hailed Red Symphony book attributed to “Josef Landowksy” purportedly recounting the interrogation of a Soviet official named Rakovsky;

• The much-quoted essay “A Racial Program for the 20th Century” supposedly penned by “Israel Cohen”;

• Freemason Albert Pike’s assertion that three world wars had been planned in advance. (While that theme may well be true, the Pike quotation cited so often, is a fraud.);

• An excerpt from a speech by David Rockefeller thanking the media for withholding news reports on Bilderberg;

• A much-heralded report, supposedly approved by U.S. intelligence agencies, predicting the demise of Israel;

These are only a few examples among many. While much of what appears in these forgeries “sounds good” and meets with the approval of many, the stories themselves just aren’t true.

There are other methods of spreading falsehoods, disguised by other sometimes clever—but sinister—means.

An increasingly popular scenario for inserting disinformation into popular discourse has been the “discovery” of hidden “diaries” and other documents described as the musings of dead Nazis or dead CIA officers or dead international bankers, judicious examination of which will reveal they are fictions based on carefully-crafted interweaving of a variety of previously published material freely accessible in other literature.

In other cases, you’ll find very real news stories or existing documents have been altered or otherwise misrepresented as to their meaning.

For example, one innocuous media report about the corrupt Goldman Sachs (GS) banking empire was slightly amended by a rumor-monger to include the claim that GS losses had been channeled to secret bank accounts in Israel.

While that allegation is entirely believable, the part of the story relating to the secret accounts was a fabrication that many unwittingly thus attributed to a “reliable” media source.

And then there’s the legendary executive order (EO) 11110 by JFK creating U.S. notes that was supposedly reversed after JFK’s assassination by LBJ. A careful analysis proved that the EO was real, but had nothing to do with U.S. notes. It goes on and on and on.

Next week: the fantastic myths that the Bush, Rockefeller and Rothschild families along with a host of “Jewish bankers”—working together or independently—helped finance Hitler’s rise to power.

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Michael Collins Piper is an author, journalist, lecturer and radio show host. He has spoken in Russia, Malaysia, Iran, Abu Dhabi, Japan, Canada and the U.S.

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