Truths, Lies and Myths of Bush 41

From the JFK assassination to Iran-Contra to John Hinckley Jr.,former President George H.W. Bush was omnipresent. With his recent death and the exorbitant media hoopla over his “greatness,” AFP is pleased to offer our readers S.T.’s article from last week’s paper as well as another timely interview from the Midnight Writer News Show.

By S.T. Patrick

As former President George H.W. Bush was lying in state beneath the rotunda of the Capitol in Washington, D.C., indelible moments emerged from the mourning. President Donald Trump and former Sen. Bob Dole both saluted the former World War II veteran. Bush’s service dog, Sully, sat near the coffin in a photo widely circulated by Bush family spokesman Jim McGrath.

Jon Meacham, one of the “great historians” of academia, and Bush grandson George Prescott Bush were two of the four persons chosen to eulogize the man who had, in his last decades, been simply called “41,” denoting the number of his presidency and differentiating him from “W,” his son. It was state-sponsored drama on the largest scale, and the mainstream media bit. Propaganda is often beautiful.

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Many of the memories and accolades dispensed after Bush passed away on Nov. 30 have been bookends of his life: salutes to military service and tales of the congenial elder statesman. Bush, to many, is heard internally in the voice of comedian Dana Carvey saying, “Not gonna do it.” The intentional error of the media saturation is that there is much about Bush’s life that should be discussed. The most consequential sections of his long life reside within the bookends.

After graduating from Yale as a member of the secret society Skull and Bones in 1948, Bush was almost immediately initiated into the globalist hierarchy of his father, Prescott, who had been a senator from Connecticut. After questionable successes and failures with Zapata Oil, an offshore drilling firm, Bush moved to partisan politics, becoming the chairman of the Harris County (Texas) Republican Party in February 1963. That November, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, three hours by car from Harris County. It was a moment never forgotten by everyone who had lived through it. Everyone, that is, except Bush.

For years, Bush peddled “somewhere in Texas” as his location in reference to Kennedy’s last day. Bush’s penchant for misremembering vital historical moments would not end in 1963, but that was an important year for Bush. He had just concluded a hotly contested Senate race against incumbent Democrat Ralph Yarborough (which Bush lost by eight points). Being the only living adult in Texas to forget where they were on Nov. 22, 1963 was more than perplexing. It was suspicious.

In fact, researcher and author Joseph McBride gave us a reason to be suspect of Bush and Dallas, with documentation. While researching an unrelated book, McBride unearthed an FBI document stating that a “Mr. George Bush of the Central Intelligence Agency” had been briefed on Cuban activities the day after the assassination. When Warren Commissioner Gerald Ford appointed Bush to be the director of Central Intelligence Agency in 1976, one of the public persuasions was that he had never had a tie to the CIA. The agency was still reeling from a public-relations war it had temporarily been losing after the Church Committee had exposed its global misdeeds in 1975. Bush claimed he had no ties to the CIA before being named as its director, but further research has validated McBride and not Bush, potentially taking the tie back to 1953.

Kingdom Identity

When Lee Harvey Oswald’s closest confidant in Dallas, oil geologist and Russian anti-communist George DeMohrenschildt, was suicided in March 1977, shortly before testifying to the House Select Committee on Assassinations, the nickname (“Poppy”), address, and phone number of Bush was found in one of DeMohrenschildt’s important notebooks. As it turns out, Oswald’s Dallas handler (as some called him) was an uncle of Bush’s prep school roommate and a friend of Jackie Kennedy’s parents.

After spending the Watergate era chairing the Republican National Committee and sharing mutual friends with Nixon administration counsel John Dean, Bush was attached to the GOP presidential ticket in 1980. Ford had rejected the idea of having Bush as his own vice president. Instead, Bush was given the infinitely more valuable position at the CIA. Ford may not have liked the idea of having Bush one heartbeat away from the oval office.

In Barbara Honegger’s book October Surprise, Bush and Ronald Reagan-era CIA director William Casey are blamed for much of the campaign strategy that resulted in the Iranian hostage crisis being extended until Reagan’s inauguration day. This would lead to funds from Iranian arms sales being siphoned off and sent to Central America to illegally fund the Nicaraguan Contras.

On March 30, 1981, Bush almost found that heartbeat he needed to ascend to the West Wing when Reagan was shot and nearly killed by John Hinckley Jr., who proclaimed he had shot at Reagan as a means by which he could “impress” actress Jodie Foster.

These are still, today, the establishment’s plot points. What is often ignored is that Bush’s son, Neil, was scheduled to have dinner with Hinckley’s brother, Scott, the night of the assassination attempt. Bush had long known John Hinckley Sr., who had been president of both Vanderbilt Energy and World Vision.

On Sept.11, 1990, Bush’s ideological directions became clear as he stood before a joint session of Congress and proclaimed that a “New World Order” (NWO) could emerge out of the strife in the Middle East. Former ally Saddam Hussein had just sent troops into disputed borderlands between Iraq and Kuwait. Reorganizing the Middle East, a project ongoing today and further complicated by George W. Bush and Barack Obama, was the key to establishing Bush’s NWO. It’s also vital to understanding Bush, a man who had, for over 40 years, gleefully aligned himself with the CIA, the UN, globalists, neoconservative war hawks, and Big Oil—misremembering much of it and yet always reminding us that he was a veteran.


The Midnight Writer News Show Episode 105: “Presidential Puppetry with Andrew Krieg”

To discuss the abysmal media coverage surrounding the passing of the late George H.W. Bush, we decided to talk to a man who has traversed the beltway for decades, digging up the inside information on past presidents and candidates. Andrew Krieg, director of the Justice Integrity Project and author of Presidential Puppetry: Obama, Romney and Their Masters, joins S.T. Patrick to discuss presidential politics of the last 40 years.

What should we have known about George H.W. Bush, Bill and Hillary Clinton, George W. Bush, John Kerry, John Edwards, and John McCain? Krieg takes a non-partisan approach to dissecting the pros, cons, misdeeds, and motivations of American presidential and vice-presidential candidates, dating back decades.

In the interview, Krieg covers the Bush dynasty, why Reagan chose Bush in 1980, Bush and the October Surprise, the Willie Horton ad, The Election of 1992, Ross Perot’s deficiencies, what Fletcher Prouty still teaches us, the legitimacy of Bob Dole’s 1996 nomination, the value of Jack Kemp, Bush v Gore, the Two Johns: Kerry & Edwards, the real John McCain, and much more.

Krieg also discusses current events with us, including the Corsi/Stone vs. Mueller situation and the unbelievable resolution of the Jeffery Epstein trial in Palm Beach.

S.T. Patrick holds degrees in both journalism and social studies education. He spent ten years as an educator and now hosts the “Midnight Writer News Show.” He can be reached at [email protected].